The gap between men and women is especially big in medicine, where only 20 percent of all doctors in Japan are female.

Tetsuo Yukioka, managing director of Tokyo Medical University, (centre), speaks during a press conference Tuesday, August 7, 2018, in Tokyo.
Tetsuo Yukioka, managing director of Tokyo Medical University, (centre), speaks during a press conference Tuesday, August 7, 2018, in Tokyo. (AP)

The Japanese Prime Minister, Shinzo Abe, has made a priority of creating a society "where women can shine."

But they still face an uphill battle in education and employment.

A Japanese medical school was recently discovered to have deliberately cut women's scores on their entrance tests, and to have been doing so for at least ten years, because they're more likely to quit once they have kids. 

Tokyo Medical University confirmed after an internal investigation that it systematically altered entrance exam scores for years to keep out female applicants and ensure more men became doctors.

But, as TRT World's Mayu Yoshida reports, many female doctors and nurses say they're struggling to find a work-life balance.

Source: TRTWorld and agencies