Unique antibacterial properties have been found in the milk of the platypus, a monotreme found only in Australia.

One of two duck-billed platypus born in Melbourne, Australia's Healesville Sanctuary is seen swimming on May 6, 1999.
One of two duck-billed platypus born in Melbourne, Australia's Healesville Sanctuary is seen swimming on May 6, 1999. (Reuters Archive)

Australian scientists have discovered that one of the world's weirdest animals may hold the answer to the global antibiotic resistance. 

Unique antibacterial properties have been found in the milk of the duck-billed platypus, a monotreme found only in Australia. 

The unique duck-billed platypus — an egg-laying, furry animal with web feet that spends most of its time underwater — is part bird, part reptile and part mammal according to its gene map.

When the platypus was first discovered, English scientists regarded it to be an Australian joke, thinking someone had stuck a duck’s bill and feet onto an otter-like animal.

The platypus is classified as a mammal because it produces milk, suckles its young and is covered in fur, but it also lays eggs like a bird or reptile and males have poisonous spurs on their hind legs like a reptile.

TRT World's Sarah Morice has been "Down Under" to see for herself.

Source: TRT World