Egypt’s Health Minister Hala Zayed issued a decree stating that the national anthem, followed by doctor’s oath will take place every morning in hospitals to promote "patriotism and loyalty."

Egyptian President Abdel Fattah el Sisi (3rd L) visits police officer Mohamed el Hayes, who was rescued after being kidnapped during an attack in the Western Desert, at a military hospital in Cairo, Egypt on November 1, 2017
Egyptian President Abdel Fattah el Sisi (3rd L) visits police officer Mohamed el Hayes, who was rescued after being kidnapped during an attack in the Western Desert, at a military hospital in Cairo, Egypt on November 1, 2017 (Reuters)

A decision by Egypt's new health minister to have intercoms in state hospitals play the national anthem every morning, followed by a recitation of the Hippocratic oath, has set off a storm on social media.

The minister, Hala Zayed, insists her decision will help promote "patriotism and loyalty" and remind doctors of their "professional ethical code and humanitarian role."

However, many Egyptians took to networking sites on Wednesday, ridiculing the move. Some suggested the minister should instead focus on improving conditions in derelict state hospitals.

Zayed's edict may simply be a case of patriotic overdose amid a wave of new-found devotion for all things Egyptian.

President Abdel Fattah el Sisi has since taking power in 2014 struck a patriotic chord among Egyptians by his beloved and often-repeated mantra of "Long Live Egypt!"

Source: AP