A non-profit group provides sport lessons for displaced Syrian girls in Jordan who wants to become international squash players.

US charity Reclaim Childhood's Clayton Keir (C) poses with Syrian refugee girls and their parents during a squash training session in the Jordanian capital Amman, November 18, 2017.
US charity Reclaim Childhood's Clayton Keir (C) poses with Syrian refugee girls and their parents during a squash training session in the Jordanian capital Amman, November 18, 2017. (AFP)

A non-profit group in Jordan is trying to help Syrian refugee girls by teaching how to play squash and practice English to help them compete in tournaments and get into good schools.

The organisation aims to turn girls participating in Squash Dreamers programme into international squash players.

"We want them to be at a level where they play in Jordan, in the Arab world and internationally and compete with other countries and show other countries how we created this project for Syrian girls to improve them and allow them to compete internationally," said coach Saad Hijazi.

"We train five times a week and training includes English lessons aimed at helping them compete in tournaments in Jordan and abroad," said Clayton Keir, a founder of Squash Dreamers.

Since the conflict in Syria broke out in 2011 the UN estimates more than 330,000 children have been among the waves of people who fled across the border into Jordan.

TRT World’s Ben Said reports.

Source: TRTWorld and agencies