Turkey's interior ministry says a number of suspects, including pilots, have been detained as part of the investigation launched into Carlos Ghosn fleeing Japan to Lebanon via Turkey.

Carlos Ghosn fled to Lebanon before his trial in Japan on financial misconduct charges.
Carlos Ghosn fled to Lebanon before his trial in Japan on financial misconduct charges. (Reuters Archive)

Turkish authorities are investigating possible security flaws that allowed former Nissan Chairman Carlos Ghosn to skip bail in Japan and flee to Lebanon via Istanbul.

Turkey's interior ministry said a number of suspects, including pilots, have been detained as part of its investigation.

Ghosn fled to Lebanon this week before his trial in Japan on financial misconduct charges. 

He had flown to Lebanon on a private jet via Istanbul.

Interpol arrest warrant for Ghosn

Lebanon said that Ghosn entered the country legally and there was no reason to take action against him.

Beirut, however, said its judiciary received a red notice from Interpol for the arrest of the fugitive auto tycoon.

Japan does not have an extradition treaty with Lebanon.

Ghosn, who was charged with under-reporting his future compensation and a breach of trust, has repeatedly asserted his innocence. 

He says Japanese authorities trumped up the charges to prevent a possible fuller merger between Nissan Motor Co. and alliance partner Renault SA.

A $14 million bail that Ghosn posted on two separate instances to get out of detention is being revoked.

'I did it alone'

Also on Thursday, Ghosn claimed he organised his dramatic escape from bail in Japan alone as the disgraced auto tycoon enjoyed his first days of freedom in Beirut.

Ghosn denied through the Paris-based agency handling his PR that his family had anything to do with his escape.

"The media reports saying my wife Carole and other family members played a role in my departure from Japan are falsehoods. I alone organised my departure," he said.

Source: AP