Besides Turkey-US relations, the top officials from both countries discussed issues pertaining to the east Mediterranean, Cyprus, Afghanistan, Upper Karabakh, Syria, Libya and the Covid-19 pandemic during the nearly hour-long conversation.

Turkey's Chief Foreign Policy Adviser Ibrahim Kalin answers journalists' questions after meeting in Istanbul, Turkey on November 29, 2020.
Turkey's Chief Foreign Policy Adviser Ibrahim Kalin answers journalists' questions after meeting in Istanbul, Turkey on November 29, 2020. (AA)

Turkish Presidential Advisor and Spokesman Ibrahim Kalin and US National Security Advisor Jake Sullivan spoke on the phone, marking the first official contact between the two countries since US President Joe Biden took office.

Besides Turkey-US relations, the top officials  discussed Eastern Mediterranean, Cyprus, Afghanistan, Upper Karabakh, Syria, Libya and the Covid-19 pandemic during the nearly hour-long conversation on Tuesday.

The two officials agreed on strengthening political dialogue regarding Syria and Libya, and noted that a joint and effective fight was essential to confront terror groups.

The latest situation in northwestern Idlib city of Syria was also discussed, with the officials arguing a new influx of refugees would trigger regional instability and humanitarian crisis that require tangible and quick measures.

Furthermore, the exploratory talks between Turkey and Greece are expected to contribute to the peace and stability in the Eastern Mediterranean, according to an official statement.

Kalin and Sullivan agreed to strengthen the NATO alliance, and to take steps that boost regional and global peace and stability.

Both officials highlighted importance of strengthening Turkish-US ties in the coming period, staying in close contact, and using dialogue channels open for constructive cooperation.

According to the statement, Turkey also welcomed the US decision to return to the Paris Agreement (COP21) and it is of great importance to have international solidarity in the context of fighting climate change.

'Support to terrorists unacceptable'

Kalin told Sullivan that joint efforts were needed to find a solution to present disagreements between the countries such as Turkey's purchase of Russian S-400 defence systems, and the United States' support the YPG-PYD in northern Syria.

The YPG is the Syrian offshoot of the PKK terrorist group that has been waging a deadly armed campaign claiming more than 40,000 lives.

Turkey, the US, the UK and EU recognise the PKK as a terrorist outfit.

READ MORE: Turkish, US officials discuss de-escalation in Syria, refugee crisis

Tense relations

In December, Washington imposed sanctions on Turkish defence institution over its acquisition of the Russian-made S-400 defence systems, a move Turkey called a "grave mistake."

It also removed Turkey, a NATO ally, from its F-35 fighter jet programme as a result.

Washington says the S-400s pose a threat to its F-35 fighter jets and to NATO's broader defence systems. 

Turkey rejects this, saying S-400s will not be integrated into NATO, and has offered to form a joint working group to examine the conflicting claims. A proposal shunned by Washington so far.

Ankara says its purchase of the S-400s was not a choice, but rather a necessity as it was unable to procure missile defence systems from the US and other NATO allies with satisfactory conditions.

READ MORE: The future of the Turkey-US relationship

Source: TRTWorld and agencies