In an interview, Prime Minister Imran Khan revealed that resignation, no-confidence vote and elections were the three options he had been given by the "establishment" and that "his life is also in danger".

Imran Khan accused opposition parties of collaborating with foreign powers that openly call for regime change.
Imran Khan accused opposition parties of collaborating with foreign powers that openly call for regime change. (Reuters Archive)

Embattled Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan has said that opposition parties sent him three options through the military establishment: resign, face a no-confidence motion, or announce a fresh election.

"I will not resign," Khan declared speaking to local ARY TV, adding that if he wins the no-confidence vote, expected Sunday, he may call a new election.

He criticised the opposition parties, saying that he got reports last August that some leaders were visiting foreign embassies in Islamabad, and that even former Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif had met with Hussain Haqqani in London.

Haqqani, a US-based former Pakistan ambassador to the US, was close to former President Asif Ali Zardari.

The Pakistani military also accused Haqqani in 2011 of issuing visas to US intelligence officials as an ambassador with the consent of the then-Pakis tan Peoples Party (PPP) government in 2008.

“People like Husain Haqqani were meeting with Nawaz Sharif in London,” Khan told the broadcaster.

He accused opposition parties of collaborating with foreign powers that openly call for regime change.

READ MORE: Pakistan's Imran Khan accuses US of meddling; Washington denies charge

'My life is also in danger'

Asked about a threatening memo he said he received, Khan said the foreign country behind the memo not only wanted to topple his government but also threatened consequences if his government was not removed.

Khan claimed his life is in danger but he is not going anywhere.

“Let me inform the nation that my life is also in danger ... they have also planned for my character assassination, including my wife," Khan said, adding that he will not sit at home but will fight.

Earlier Friday, the information minister said Khan's security has been beefed up following reports of an assassination plot.

Fawad Chaudhry's remark came a day after Faisal Vawda, a former minister, made similar claims and stated Khan's life was in danger.

The remarks come against the backdrop of a looming no-confidence vote on Khan this weekend, as well as Khan's assertions that the US, Pakistan's longtime ally, is plotting to oust him for his "independent foreign policy."

The combined opposition, led by the PPP and Pakistan Muslim League-Nawaz, submitted a no-confidence motion against Khan on March 8, and voting is expected to be held on Sunday.

The ruling Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf has 155 members in the 342-member National Assembly and needs at least 172 lawmakers to remain in power.

Besides losing some allies, about two dozen of Khan's own legislators have expressed their support for the opposition, which now claims a majority in the lower house of parliament and has called on the prime minister to step down.

READ MORE: Ally ditches Pakistan PM Imran Khan ahead of make-or-break parliament vote

Source: TRTWorld and agencies