Swedish Prime Minister Magdalena Andersson says the PKK is a designated terror organisation and posing with its flags is "extremely inappropriate".

Andersson's country applied to join the 30-member NATO alliance in May, a decision spurred by Russia's offensive against Ukraine.
Andersson's country applied to join the 30-member NATO alliance in May, a decision spurred by Russia's offensive against Ukraine. (AFP)

Sweden's Prime Minister Magdalena Andersson has condemned a group of left-wing MPs for posing with flags from the PKK terrorist group and its affiliates.

Andersson's condemnation on Wednesday came a day after NATO kicked off the accession procedures for Sweden and Finland, who have promised Türkiye of action against the PKK and its offshoots in a trilateral memorandum.

Images on social media showed on Tuesday parliamentarians from the Left Party, which opposed Sweden's decision to apply for NATO membership, posing with flags from the PKK as well as its Syrian offshoot, the YPG, and the all-female YPJ.

"The PKK is a designated terror organisation not just in Sweden but in the EU, and posing with such flags is extremely inappropriate," Andersson told news agency TT.

Sweden's Left Party is not part of the government but is helping prop up Andersson's Social Democrat cabinet. The images were taken during an annual political gathering on the island of Gotland.

In its more than 35-year terror campaign against Türkiye, the PKK — listed as a terrorist organisation by Türkiye, the US, EU and NATO — has been responsible for the deaths of over 40,000 people, including women, children, and infants.

READ MORE: Türkiye to monitor implementation of deal with Finland, Sweden: Altun

Türkiye’s extradition requests

On Wednesday, Turkish Justice Minister Bekir Bozdag told Haber Global television that letters had been sent to Sweden and Finland, renewing Türkiye’s requests for the extradition of suspects for whom earlier requests had been rejected.

The letters also “reminded” the two countries about suspects whose cases are still pending, he said in an interview.

According to the memorandum, the Nordic countries will address Türkiye's pending deportation or extradition requests of terror suspects, and investigate and interdict financing as well as recruitment activities of the PKK and other terrorist groups.

Sweden and Finland applied to join the 30-member NATO alliance in May, a decision spurred by Russia's offensive against Ukraine.

But Türkiye, a longstanding member, voiced objections, criticising the countries for tolerating and even supporting terror groups.

The memorandum of understanding involving Ankara, Stockholm and Helsinki signed on the sidelines of a crucial June-end NATO summit paved the way for Sweden's and Finland's NATO entry.

Still, the Nordic countries’ accession needs to be approved by the parliaments of all 30 NATO members.

Türkiye has called on Sweden and Finland to fulfil their promises before the ratification of the memorandum in Turkish parliament and says Ankara will continue to monitor whether the two Nordic countries comply with the deal.

"If they do not fulfil promised obligations, the memorandum will not reach Turkish parliament for approval," Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said at the end of the NATO summit in Madrid.

READ MORE: Türkiye: Sweden, Finland have to comply with memorandum to be part of NATO

Source: TRTWorld and agencies