The development will allow for a more seamless and cost-effective basic sniper training for Turkish security forces.

Leading Turkish defence giant Havelsan has developed a sniper simulator that is ready for use and will first be put into service at a commando training centre in Turkey’s central-western Isparta province. 

Developed in a short period of time to meet the demands of urban operations, and following the feedback of Turkish security forces, the simulator has been upgraded and its effectiveness reached its peak.

The development is another contribution towards Turkey’s Vision for 2023 project, which consists of a list of goals that includes ranking among the top ten economies and becoming self-sufficient in defence.

There are many private companies and public enterprises working on producing high-tech military equipment such as ASELSAN, Turkish Aerospace Industries, Roketsan, TUBITAK, Baykar, Tusas and FNSS Defence Systems. 

Among them is Havelsan, which has been providing software-based solutions within the Turkish defence industry and develops technological products that meet the training needs of security forces.

The recently developed simulator allows security staff to practice aiming, distance determination, binocular adjustment and shooting techniques in a training environment with real equipment without using live ammunition.

The simulator’s manufacturer, Havelsan, is now working on a project that can be used in training by applying a real ballistic model - this would  improve the scenarios in the simulation and integrate the scenarios desired by the user into the system.
The simulator’s manufacturer, Havelsan, is now working on a project that can be used in training by applying a real ballistic model - this would improve the scenarios in the simulation and integrate the scenarios desired by the user into the system. (AA)

By using the simulator, basic sniper training will be conducted cost-effectively and will be carried out with much more ease than previous systems. 

Shooting training can currently be done at distances of between 500 metres to 600 metres (1,640 feet to 1,968 feet). For sniper training, it is necessary to create a security area at much longer distances and in a wide area of 2 to 5 square kilometres (0.77 to 1.93 square miles).
Shooting training can currently be done at distances of between 500 metres to 600 metres (1,640 feet to 1,968 feet). For sniper training, it is necessary to create a security area at much longer distances and in a wide area of 2 to 5 square kilometres (0.77 to 1.93 square miles). (AA)

One of the most important features of the simulator is that it eliminates the need for providing a secure area for training and also enables safe training with real weapons and equipment in desired environmental scenarios.

The person using the simulator can effectively receive basic training in a closed area at different times of the day, altitudes and weather conditions. The simulator has technical features, such as realistic 3D images and the option for special binoculars.
The person using the simulator can effectively receive basic training in a closed area at different times of the day, altitudes and weather conditions. The simulator has technical features, such as realistic 3D images and the option for special binoculars. (AA)

By using real equipment and ballistic models in the simulator, Havelsan’s product differentiates itself from other existing technology.

Havelsan also manufactures flight simulators, the Virtual Maintenance Training System, the F-16 simulator and the Airbus A320 full-flight simulator, all developed under the Simulation, Autonomous and Platform Management Technologies Center.

The company has also been playing a vital role in Turkey’s TF-X National Combat Aircraft (MMU) programme — a joint project by the Turkish Aerospace Industries (TAI) and SSB —  which will be ready to launch its maiden flight using a domestic engine in 2029.

Based on the programme, Havelsan will develop the turbofan jet fighter engine for the craft and will ensure the establishment of the design and test verification infrastructures of plant, control models and the development of computer-based design tools to meet quality assurances.

Source: TRT World