The mid-term is seen as a referendum on the policies of US President Donald Trump, and opposition Democrats hope to gain more seats in the lower house and Senate. We speaks to some of the women voters.

Desteny Martinez, 18, votes for the first time, in the US congressional and gubernatorial mid-term elections in Norwalk, California, on October 24, 2018.
Desteny Martinez, 18, votes for the first time, in the US congressional and gubernatorial mid-term elections in Norwalk, California, on October 24, 2018. (Reuters)

The role of #Metoo is expected to be major in the November 6 mid-term elections, when voters choose a third of US Senators, all 435 members of the House of Representatives and dozens of state governors.

The mid-term elections are seen as a referendum on the policies of US President Donald Trump, and opposition Democrats hope to gain control of the lower House and gain seats in the Senate, both now controlled by Trump's Republican Party.

"We're going to have a lot more feminists sitting in those seats," said Toni Van Pelt, president of the National Organization for Women.

More than 42,000 women interested in running for office have contacted Emily's List, an advocacy group supporting female candidates, since Trump was elected in 2016.

TRT World's Courtney Kealy speaks to some of the women voters in New York.

Source: TRTWorld and agencies