People of the war-ravaged city will head for the ballot boxes on Saturday, hoping for a new beginning.

An Iraqi security member shows his ink-stained finger after casting his vote at a polling station two days before polls open to the public in a parliamentary election in Baghdad, Iraq May 10, 2019.
An Iraqi security member shows his ink-stained finger after casting his vote at a polling station two days before polls open to the public in a parliamentary election in Baghdad, Iraq May 10, 2019. (Reuters)

Residents of Mosul, reeling from atrocities committed by Daesh, will vote in a parliamentary election on Saturday.

The city bears scars of the intense battle it witnessed, particularly in the Old Mosul district, even though a year has gone by since Daesh was defeated.

Wary of the struggles of people in the war-torn city, the candidates use popular slogans to win hearts. "We will rebuild our city", "Mosul is our identity", and "We will fight corruption", to name a few.

TRT World's Sara Firth visited the city to find out how people are feeling ahead of the vote.

The signs of Daesh have been removed from the city. Instead, the walls are plastered with posters of candidates and flags of political parties.

A total of 940 candidates, 253 of whom are women, will compete for a spot in the parliament in the first post-Daesh election.

Over two million voters are registered in the city, said Ferhan Kiki, media officer of the High Electoral Commission.

"The voting will take place in 5,045 polling booths in 806 different areas of Mosul," he said.

He added that polling booths will be established in camps outside of Mosul.

"If the circumstances allow voting, there will be ballot boxes in camps so that internally displaced people of Mosul can vote," he said.

Mohammed Ali, representative of Iraqi Turkmen Front, said he was optimistic about voter turnout.

Recalling the last election when the participation rate was below 55 percent due to looming terror threats, Ali said this time there will be a different atmosphere.

Ali added that he expected a 65 percent participation as the Daesh threat had been eliminated.

In July 2016, the Iraqi forces gained the control of the province which had been under Daesh occupation for some three years.

Source: AA