People who escaped the conflict earlier have been returning homes after Turkish forces cleared a 2,055-square kilometre area from terrorists, but security challenges in the region remain.

Sacrificial sheep are seen after Eid Al Adha (Feast of Sacrifice) prayer in Al Bab, Syria on August 21, 2018. Turkey's Operation Euphrates Shield, launched in late 2016, cleared Al Bab of the Daesh.
Sacrificial sheep are seen after Eid Al Adha (Feast of Sacrifice) prayer in Al Bab, Syria on August 21, 2018. Turkey's Operation Euphrates Shield, launched in late 2016, cleared Al Bab of the Daesh. (AA)

Parts of northern Syria, which were cleared of terrorist organisations by Turkish armed forces, finds life returning to normal two years after the start of Turkey’s Operation Euphrates Shield.

The operation, which began on August 24, 2016 and ended in March 2017, was aimed at eliminating the terror threat along the Turkish border in the northern Syrian regions of Jarabulus, Al Rai, Al Bab, and Azaz with the use of the Free Syrian Army, backed by Turkish artillery and air cover.

Since then, Turkey has established safe zones in Northern Syria, but security challenges in the region remain.

TRT World's Alaattin Kilic reports.

Fixing infrastructure

At least 5,000 police officers have been trained by Turkey to keep the area secure.

At least 1.5 million civilians are already living in these regions, while people who escaped from the attacks and repression continue to return to their home.

The population has increased five-fold from January 2018.

Also, at least 6,000 teachers in 500 schools that have been repaired give lessons to 200,000 students.

New hospitals are also being built. Turkey first built one that can treat about 400 patients daily in the Jarabulus district.

Source: AA