Honolulu US District Judge Derrick Watson says Hawaii is likely to succeed in proving that US President Donald Trump’s latest travel ban violates federal immigration law.

Zarfishan Zahid (L) smiles as Sana Tahir (R) holds Malaika Noman, 3, as the child arrives in the US after a federal judge ruled that President Trump's temporary ban on travellers from six Muslim-majority countries cannot stop grandparents and other relatives of US citizens from entering the country, at Washington Dulles International Airport in Dulles on July 14, 2017.
Zarfishan Zahid (L) smiles as Sana Tahir (R) holds Malaika Noman, 3, as the child arrives in the US after a federal judge ruled that President Trump's temporary ban on travellers from six Muslim-majority countries cannot stop grandparents and other relatives of US citizens from entering the country, at Washington Dulles International Airport in Dulles on July 14, 2017. (Reuters)

A federal judge in Hawaii on Tuesday blocked US President Donald Trump's revised travel ban order, a day before it was set to take effect.

The ruling prompted officials to resume regular processing of visas for nationals of Chad, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Syria, and Yemen.

The US District Judge Derrick Watson in Honolulu said that Hawaii was likely to succeed in proving that Trump’s latest travel ban violates federal immigration law.

The White House responded immediately, calling it a "dangerously-flawed" ruling, which it said, "undercuts the president's efforts to keep the American people safe."

The open-ended ban, announced last month, targeted people from Iran, Libya, Syria, Yemen, Somalia, Chad and North Korea, as well as certain government officials from Venezuela. 

Third time Trump order is blocked

It was the third version of a policy that had previously targeted some Muslim-majority countries but had been restricted by the courts.

Trump signed the first travel ban executive order during his first week in office. 

It targeted seven Muslim-majority countries for a period of 90 days, including Syrian refugees.

After a federal district court blocked the order‚ Trump issues a revised ban in March. That too was blocked by a federal court. 

The third travel ban order, according to Hawaii federal court, "suffers from precisely the same maladies as its predecessor."

The ruling sets up another high stakes battle over Trump's executive authority which legal experts expect will ultimately land in the US Supreme Court. 

Meanwhile, the White House wants another appeal.  

TRT World's Ediz Tiyansan has more from Washington.

Source: TRTWorld and agencies