The statement from Swedish Foreign Minister Ann Linde comes as Stockholm faces pressure from Türkiye to end its support for the PKK/YPG terror group if it wants to join NATO.

Ann Linde noted that the country's new terror law would go into effect as of July 1 and that her country could alter the conditions stipulated for arms exports for the sake of its NATO bid.
Ann Linde noted that the country's new terror law would go into effect as of July 1 and that her country could alter the conditions stipulated for arms exports for the sake of its NATO bid. (AFP)

Swedish foreign minister has said that the Nordic country aims to proceed in a constructive manner on the concerns that Türkiye has raised against Stockholm's bid to join NATO. 

Presenting a document on Swedish foreign policy to lawmakers on Friday, Ann Linde stressed that her country would contribute to Turkish security in line with the alliance solidarity.

Linde said Sweden would maintain a constructive attitude to address the concerns of Ankara, which has repeatedly said it would not permit the ascension process while terror affiliates move freely within the Scandinavian country.

Condemning terrorism, she noted that the country's new terror law would go into effect as of July 1 and that her country could alter the conditions stipulated for arms exports for the sake of its NATO bid.

READ MORE: Türkiye's evidence shows Sweden supplies weapons to PKK terror outfit

Criticism over deal with pro-PKK/YPG lawmaker

In criticism of Linde, Mikael Oscarsson, a lawmaker of the Christian Democratic Party, pointed to a reported deal between the Swedish Social Democratic Party and Amineh Kakabaveh, an independent member of parliament who supports the PKK terror group and its Syrian offshoot YPG.

Oscarsson asked how it could be possible to keep negotiations going with Türkiye while a deal with Kakabaveh had already been struck, calling the lawmaker a "political savage."

Linde in response underlined that talks with Ankara were ongoing to find mutual ground.

Sweden is under pressure from Türkiye to end its support for the PKK/YPG terror group if it wants to join NATO, with Ankara saying the bloc is a security alliance and that any potential members must take a clear stance against terrorism.

In its more than 35-year terror campaign against Türkiye, the PKK – listed as a terror organisation by Türkiye, the US, and EU – has been responsible for the deaths of over 40,000 people, including women, children, and infants. 

The YPG is the PKK terror group's Syrian offshoot. 

READ MORE: Amineh Kakabaveh: The MP standing between Sweden and NATO

Source: AA