The 2,000 Syrian pound banknote featuring regime leader Bashar al Assad's portrait has been in circulation for two months across the country, but the move has been met with controversy by Syrians who are not comfortable using it.

The banknote previously carried images of historic places and icons or pictures of Assads late father.
The banknote previously carried images of historic places and icons or pictures of Assads late father. (File Photo Reuters)

The Syrian currency has plunged dramatically in value since the beginning of the civil war in 2011.

In July, the regime introduced a new banknote with a higher denomination – a 2,000 pound bill.

The new note is worth approximately $4 at current exchange rates and carries a portrait of Syrian regime leader Bashar al Assad, a very controversial image for hundreds of thousands of Syrians. 

It has been in circulation across the country for two months, but in opposition-held areas it has found no takers.

“I have lost family members because of Assad. For me, accepting a banknote portraying his face would be indignity,” Mustafa Hassan, a Syrian supermarket owner says.

TRT World’s Alican Ayanlar reports from the Syrian city of Azaz.

Source: TRT World