Ahead of the announcement, opposition supporters in Kyrgyzstan had seized several government buildings in the country's capital, freed ex-president Atambayev from jail and announced plans to oust the president and form a new government.

People protest against the results of a parliamentary vote in Bishkek on October 5, 2020.
People protest against the results of a parliamentary vote in Bishkek on October 5, 2020. (AP)

Kyrgyzstan's parliamentary election results, which took place on Sunday, have been declared invalid after mass protests erupted throughout the country.

The decision by the country's Central Election Commission came on Tuesday shortly after President Sooronbay Jeenbekov said he ordered a thorough investigation into possible election violations.

Ahead of the announcement, opposition supporters in Kyrgyzstan had seized several government buildings in Bishkek, the country's capital, freed the ex-president from jail and announced plans to oust the president and form a new government.

Kyrgyz opposition politician and former senior security official Kursan Asanov also took over as acting interior minister, a ministry spokesman said.

READ MORE: Kyrgyz protesters free ex-president, seize seat of government

Invalid election

On Monday, Kyrgyzstan’s election body announced the first official results to choose 120 new members of parliament.

According to the preliminary results, voter turnout was around 55 percent and four political parties out of 16 passed the seven percent threshold to enter parliament: the Birimdik (Unity) Party, Mekenim Kyrgyzstan (Homeland Kyrgyzstan) Party, Kyrgyzstan Party and Butun (All) Kyrgyzstan Party.

Supporters of 12 political parties that reportedly failed to exceed the seven percent threshold set by the Central Election Commission for entry into parliament protested in Ala-Too Square in the capital, demanding that the election results be cancelled.

People protest during a rally against the results of a parliamentary vote in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan, October 5, 2020.
People protest during a rally against the results of a parliamentary vote in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan, October 5, 2020. (AP)

Public outcry

Public rallies started in several cities across Kyrgyzstan on Monday night as thousands of people protested the results of a parliamentary election.

Police used water cannons, stun grenades and tear gas to disperse protesters attempting to force their way through the gates of the building.

One person has been killed and 590 wounded in the clashes, the government said. 

People protest against the results of a parliamentary vote in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan on October 5, 2020.
People protest against the results of a parliamentary vote in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan on October 5, 2020. (AP)

Burnt out cars littered Bishkek on Tuesday morning.

Around 2,000 protesters broke into the government and security headquarters in Bishkek to free a former president from custody. 

Protesters broke into the headquarters of State Committee on National Security and freed former president Almazbek Atambayev, who was sentenced to a lengthy prison term this year on corruption charges after falling out with Jeenbekov, his successor.

The main government building, known as the White House, briefly caught fire before emergency services put out the blaze.

Seen as pro-Russian, Jeenbekov described their actions as a bid by some political forces to seize power illegally, but said the authorities did not rule out holding another vote as public rallies started in several cities across the country.

Debris from inside, including government papers, and office furniture, was strewn outside after protesters ransacked parts of it.

Several provincial governors have resigned, according to local media reports.

People try to storm the gate into the government headquarters during a rally against the results of a parliamentary vote in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan, October 5, 2020.
People try to storm the gate into the government headquarters during a rally against the results of a parliamentary vote in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan, October 5, 2020. (AP)

Opposition groups took over several more buildings, including the mayor's office, and appointed their own acting head of national security, acting prosecutor general and a commandant of Bishkek although it was unclear how much actual power they wielded.

READ MORE: Pro-presidential parties sweep Kyrgyzstan election

People protesting the results of a parliamentary vote gather by a bonfire in front of the seized main government building, known as the White House, in Bishkek, on October 6, 2020.
People protesting the results of a parliamentary vote gather by a bonfire in front of the seized main government building, known as the White House, in Bishkek, on October 6, 2020. (AFP)

Police ordered 'not to shed blood'

Jeenbekov said on Tuesday he had ordered security forces not to use firearms and "not to shed blood".

Adil Turdukuov, an activist and ally of Atambayev who witnessed the release said the ex-leader was freed "without force or use of any weapons" and that national security officials had not attempted to halt protesters.

"They surrendered," he added.

Footage posted on social media showed Atambayev, 64, greeting supporters after he left jail, where he was serving an 11-year-sentence for his role in the illegal release of a mob boss.

Protesters push a burning trash can towards riot police during a rally against the results of a parliamentary vote in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan, October 5, 2020.
Protesters push a burning trash can towards riot police during a rally against the results of a parliamentary vote in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan, October 5, 2020. (AP)

Political volatility

The Central Asian country of 6.5 million has a history of political volatility. 

In the past 15 years, two of its presidents have been toppled by revolts.

Atambayev was once close with his successor Jeenbekov, but the pair fell out shortly after the 61-year-old won the country's last presidential election in 2017.

Both men are viewed as loyal allies of Russia, whose strategic position in the country is likely to remain unaffected despite the unrest.

Russian leader Vladimir Putin tried to broker a peace between the pair last year but could not prevent Atambayev's arrest.

READ MORE: A Kyrgyz videogame begins to show up the violence of “bride kidnappings”

People protest against the results of a parliamentary vote in Bishkek on October 5, 2020.
People protest against the results of a parliamentary vote in Bishkek on October 5, 2020. (AFP)
Source: TRTWorld and agencies